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Invented Poetry Forms:

  bullet   The 7/5 Trochee
  bullet   A L'Arora
  bullet   Alliterisen
  bullet   The Alouette
  bullet   The Blitz Poem
  bullet   The Brevette
  bullet   Cascade
  bullet   Christ-in-a-Rhyme
  bullet   CinqTroisDecaLa
  bullet   Clarity Pyramid
  bullet   Constanza
  bullet   Con-Verse
  bullet   The Compound Word Verse
  bullet   Decuain
  bullet   Diatelle
  bullet   Duo-rhyme
  bullet   Epulaeryu
  bullet   Essence
  bullet   The Florette
  bullet   The Florette #2
  bullet   Grá Reformata
  bullet   Jeffreys Sonnet
  bullet   Joseph's Star
  bullet   Harrisham Rhyme
  bullet   HexSonnetta
  bullet   Inverted Refrain
  bullet   LaCharta
  bullet   LaJemme
  bullet   La'libertas
  bullet   Lannet
  bullet   La'ritmo
  bullet   La’Tuin
  bullet   Lauranelle
  bullet   Lento
  bullet   Licentia Rhyme Form
  bullet   Line Messaging
  bullet   Loop Poetry
  bullet   Mini-monoverse
  bullet   Memento
  bullet   The Mirror Sestet
  bullet   Mirrored Refrain
  bullet   Monchielle
  bullet   Monotetra
  bullet   Musette
  bullet   Nove Otto
  bullet   Octameter
  bullet   Octain Refrain
  bullet   Octelle
  bullet   Oddquain
  bullet   Paradelle
  bullet   Parallelogram de Crystalline
  bullet   The Pictorial
  bullet   Pleiades
  bullet   Puente
  bullet   Quadrilew
  bullet   RemyLa Rhyme Form
  bullet   Rictameter
  bullet   Shadow Sonnet
  bullet   Spirit’s Vessel
  bullet   Staccato
  bullet   Swap Quatrain
  bullet   Synchronicity
  bullet   The Tableau
  bullet   Tri-fall
  bullet   Trijan Refrain
  bullet   Trilonnet
  bullet   Trinet
  bullet   Triquain
  bullet   Triquatrain
  bullet   Triquint
  bullet   Trois-par-Huit
  bullet   Trolaan
  bullet   Vers Beaucoup
  bullet   Villonnet
  bullet   Wrapped Refrain
  bullet   Wrapped Refrain #2
  bullet   ZaniLa Rhyme


The HexSonnetta, created by Andrea Dietrich, consists of two six-line stanzas and a finishing rhyming couplet with the following set of rules:

Meter: Iambic Trimeter
Rhyme Scheme: a/bb/aa/b c/dd/cc/d ee

Iambic Trimeter means the usual iambic (alternating unstressed/stressed) meter for every line of the poem, but instead of the ten syllables that comprise a typical sonnet's iambic pentameter, this particular form uses six syllables of iambic trimeter per line. Thus, the name HexSonnetta. The first part of the form’s name refers to the syllable count per line. The second part of the name, Sonnetta, is to show this to be a form similar to the sonnet, yet with its shorter lines and different rhyme scheme, it is not the typical sonnet. Not only does this poem have six syllables per line, it also has a set of two six-line stanzas, giving an extra “hex” to the meaning of HexSonnetta. The rhyme scheme is a bit of a mixture of the two traditional sonnet types, with the two 6-line stanzas having more the rhyme scheme of an Italian sonnet, but with the ending rhyming couplet being the featured rhyme scheme of the English sonnet. The first stanza presents the theme of the poem, with the second stanza serving to change the tone of the poem, to introduce a new aspect of the theme or to give added details. The final couplet, as in an English sonnet, can be either a summary (if the theme is simple) or it could be the resolution to a problem presented in the theme. In any event, it should nicely tie together the whole piece and could even appear as a nice “twist” presented at the end.

Example #1:
The Woebegone

As wind begins to blow,
she’s lying in her bed.
Is he alive or dead?
She doesn’t even know. 
And as it starts to snow,
her doubts fill up her head.
She finds no answers why.
To a sad fate she’s bound.
Wind makes a mournful sound.
The woman starts to cry,
and snow from dismal sky
falls heavy on the ground.
Like fields piled high with snow,
She’s buried in her woe.

Copyright © 2009 Andrea Dietrich

Example #2:
The Bringer of Spring’s Cheer

March wasn’t like a meek
and gentle lamb when she
moved on; then gloomily
came April, and the week
stayed cold and wet and bleak,
but hope’s returned to me! 
For what would next appear
as I drove down the road?
A creature which bestowed
on me this gift of cheer. . . 
At last, the skies got clear
and sun above me glowed!
It’s truly spring, and small
Red Robin’s come to call!

Copyright © 2009 Andrea Dietrich

Example #3:
Under the Canopy

My thoughts are there with you
as, under cherry tree,
through cherry canopy
a patch of Prussian blue
is hopeful light come through;
I want you here with me.
Why must you be away,
when I have just a peak
through branches that I tweak?
Out there in light of day
is not where I will stay,
but here where blossoms speak.
It’s cherry blossom time
with canopies sublime!

Copyright © 2009 Jan Turner

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